.

Maryland Ave. Closed As Crew Installs Electrical Lines

Maryland Avenue, between Park Avenue and Beech Street, is closed to traffic Thursday afternoon as a Hawkeye contractor crew uses a crane to install electrical lines underground along the roadway. (Photo: Joseph Kellard)
Maryland Avenue, between Park Avenue and Beech Street, is closed to traffic Thursday afternoon as a Hawkeye contractor crew uses a crane to install electrical lines underground along the roadway. (Photo: Joseph Kellard)

Maryland Avenue, between Park Avenue and Beech Street, is closed to traffic Thursday afternoon as a Hawkeye contractor crew employs a crane to install electrical lines under the roadway.

Follow Long Beach Patch on Facebook.

The street is expected to reopen to traffic later in the afternoon, once the work is completed, a worker told Patch.

The West School, which is located on that section of Maryland, said the road will be reopened in time for buses and parents to pass and pick up children from school at dismissal starting at 3:30 p.m.
Eddie January 09, 2014 at 05:41 PM
I wonder if the contractors will find any remnants of the trolley track that ran between Beech and Park on Maryland. The rails were pulled up in 1930, but the ties would still be there. The gas-powered trolley bus only ran for a handful of years...
Bob West January 10, 2014 at 02:21 AM
Wow Eddie, another little historical gem from you. When I moved here I heard talk about the West End Trolley and thought it was a joke... who would put down tracks on a sandbar?!? Well, now that I know more local history, it sure fits in. Why do you think the tracks turned up Maryland? Think that was the end of "civilization" back then? I've heard all the narrow streets were originally sand "alleys" way back. Unfortunately, I moved here a little too late to see most of the center malls on the wide streets. So, what do you think made Maryland and Park the terminal? I wonder if one of the grand hotels was up there, or something like the restaurants on the Bay at Arizona, etc. It sounds geeky, but I'd *love* to see those ties if they're there. Creosote is still an amazing preservative. Maybe there'd even be some old spikes there. I had one from when the LIRR modernized the station.
Sent from my Lear Jet January 10, 2014 at 05:22 AM
I think Eddie might be a little off. 20 years or so ago they covered Minnesota and Beech St intersection with asphalt. Prior to that you could still see the curved concrete slabs where the track's made the 90 degree turn to the east on Beech St. Don't know if slabs are still under the asphalt or if they were demolished at the time of paving. LB Historical Society has a large set of 8 X 10 photos showing the tracks being laid down--Beech St was paved with sand in the pics. I have seen an old map showing trolley lines running on the mall on West Hudson St and the Mall that used to be on Broadway. Pretty sure that there were never tracks there, just dreams that never came true.
Eddie January 10, 2014 at 07:39 AM
I am a little off, but not on my trolley routing.
Eddie January 10, 2014 at 07:53 AM
Bob, when Reynolds ran for reelection as mayor around 1922, he promised Long Beach a "10 cent trolley line" and a new City Hall if he won. Previously, the beach had buses. The original development in 1909 had promised a trolley on Broadway and Hudson, as Lear states. That was never built. Reynolds was elected and he constructed tracks from Maple to Maryland. He had long envisioned the West End as part of Long Beach but it wasn't originally annexed as part of the City. Reynolds charted the Long Beach Railway and bought four used Mack railbuses with Reo bodies. They ran on gasoline. The west end looped around Maryland Street and the east terminal was a wooden turntable where the driver had to push the car around to turn it. Another turntable was at New York Boulevard to turn cars not traveling to the West End. Opening day was in 1926. In 1929 the line was abandoned and the cars were used in a practice fire for the volunteers. Reynolds also lived up to his city hall promise by constructing a beautiful municipal building with a five-story clock tower that could be seen for miles out at sea. That was demolished in 1963. Would love to share photos of that trolley with you Bob. I have a bunch.

Boards

More »
Got a question? Something on your mind? Talk to your community, directly.
Note Article
Just a short thought to get the word out quickly about anything in your neighborhood.
Share something with your neighbors.What's on your mind?What's on your mind?Make an announcement, speak your mind, or sell somethingPost something
See more »